Internal Medicine

Project Title: Pooled CRISPR Library Screening for New Vulnerabilities of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Faculty Mentor’s Name: Dr. Christopher Cogle
Phone: 352-273-9448
Email: Christopher.cogle@medicine.ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

Screening for new vulnerabilities that kill leukemia cells using CRISPR-Cas9 libraries. Experience with R or Python is preferred but not necessary. Newly identified vulnerabilities will be targets for drug development.

Entry Date: September 20, 2019

Project Title: Physician Writers and the Literature of Illness and Health

Faculty Mentor’s Name: Dr. Christopher Cogle
Phone: 352-273-9448
Email: Christopher.cogle@medicine.ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

Assist Dr. Cogle putting together two books. One on physician writers and another on the literature about illness and health. Experience editing or writing poetry or prose is preferred. Goal is to submit two books for publications by the end of Summer 2020.

Entry Date: September 20, 2019

Project Title: Measuring Progress Towards Florida Cancer Plan Objectives

Faculty Mentor’s Name: Dr. Christopher Cogle
Phone: 352-273-9448
Email: Christopher.cogle@medicine.ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

Florida Cancer Plan published in 2020. Need student to assist in measuring progress toward achieving Plan objectives. Experience in public health preferred but not necessary.

Entry Date: September 20, 2019

Project Title: Phase 3 Trial of Dichloroacetate (DCA) in Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex (PDC) Deficiency

Faculty Mentor’s Name: Dr. Peter Stacpoole
Phone: 352-273-9023
Email: pws@ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

The mitochondrial PDC is a vital energy homeostat in mammalian cells that links cytoplasmic glycolysis to the mitochondrial TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Consequently, children born with loss-of-function mutations in PDC suffer from energy failure that leads to progressive neurological and neuromuscular degeneration, lactic acidosis and early death. There is no FDA-approved treatment for this dread disease.
We developed DCA as the first targeted therapy for PDC deficiency because is stimulates residual enzyme activity, thereby promoting the oxidative removal of lactate and increasing OXPHOS. We are now embarking on a federally-funded, multicenter, randomized controlled trial of oral DCA in young children with PDC deficiency that, pending positive results, could lead to DCA being the first FDA-approved drug for this disease.
The student would learn about the translation of fundamental aspects of intermediary metabolism and drug development to executing an FDA-compliant clinical trial for a rare disease. The student would also become familiar with our broader program of the clinical development of DCA as potential treatment for cancer, septic shock, diabetic kidney disease and neonatal cardiac stress during parturition–seemingly unrelated conditions that are functionally linked by an acquired defect in PDC activity and, thus, cellular energy metabolism potentially amenable to DCA treatment.

Entry Date: October 9, 2019

Project Title: Esophageal temperature modifincation

Faculty Mentor’s Name: Dr. John Catanzaro
Phone: 917-991-7360
Email: john.catanzaro@jax.ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

To work on projects concerning with ablation of atrial fibrillation and esophageal protection.

Entry Date: October 16, 2019

Project Title: Health behavior and outcomes in persons living with HIV in Florida

Faculty Mentor’s Name: Dr. Robert Cook
Phone: 352-273-5869
Email: cookrl@ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

Florida has among the highest rate of new HIV infections in the US, and persons who have HIV are at increased risk for health care outcomes and co-morbidities such as cognitive decline. Persons with HIV can have more successful outcomes if they take anti-retroviral medications, but there are several barriers to successful HIV viral suppression. Our research team has been collecting data from over 1000 persons with HIV in Florida, with a focus on examining how alcohol consumption and marijuana use may affect HIV outcomes including cognitive function. A student working with our team for the summer would begin to plan a specific project in the spring, and during the summer, work with our data team to produce an abstract or manuscript using our existing data from the Florida Cohort or MAPLE research studies (see www.sharc-research.org). In addition, the student would gain applied experience in the day-to-day aspects of doing longitudinal research studies that involve multiple team members. Possible applied skills may involve data collection from participants, data entry, interpreting different methods of measuring marijuana consumption, linkage of data with biological and medical record information, interpretation of medical record information, attending team meetings, and attending community-based events related to the research.

Entry Date: November 7, 2019

Project Title: Improving the Survivial of Pediatric Cancer Patients in a Developing Country

Faculty Mentor’s Name: Dr. Michael Lauzardo
Phone: 352.273.7682
Email: llauzam@medicine.ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

Each year, an estimated 160,000 children around the world are diagnosed with cancer. More than 70 percent of those children do not have access to effective cancer treatment. As a result, as many as 95 percent of children with cancer in developing countries will die. That means that most children with cancer will die needlessly while the cure is in hand for those children fortunate enough to live in countries where modern treatments are available. Over the past 30 years, the treatment of children’s cancer has improved dramatically in rich countries like the United States and many pediatric cancers are now considered curable. But this is not the case for 80 percent of the world’s children who live in poverty stricken countries where cancer is often a death sentence. The Keira Grace Foundation focuses on taking proven cancer treatment to developing nations where the most impact can be made, changing the trajectory of survival rates by more than 400 percent. Modern cancer treatment should be accessible to all children, regardless of where they live. Working in collaboration with the Keira Grace Foundation, this rotation allows students the opportunity to learn first-hand what it takes to transfer world class cures for cancer to a developing country, in this case the Dominican Republic, and will assist in reviewing charts and data to better assess the impacts of these programs on the survival of children with cancer. Medical students can expect to be involved with the data review and collection efforts of this retrospective chart review study. This project is funded partially by The Keira Grace Foundation. FLUENCY IN SPANISH IS REQUIRED.

Entry Date: October 21, 2019

Project Title: Immunosenescence vs immunodeficiency: Conundrums in the evaluation of the elderly population

Faculty Mentor’s Name: Dr. Lyda Cuervo Pardo
Phone: 352.265.0007
Email: lyda.cuervopardo@medicine.ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

Co-Mentor: Mario Rodenas
Assistant Professor, Allergy & Clinical Immunology
mario.rodenas@medicine.ufl.edu

Immunosenescence, is defined as the changes in the immune system associated with age. This alterations, which accumulate to produce a progressive deterioration in the ability to respond to infections and to develop immunity after vaccination, are associated with a higher mortality rate in the elderly. Some patients can develop significant immunodeficiency and may require treatment initiation while other can be closely monitored. Making this decision can be challenging in older patients, where evidence based medicine literature is lacking.

Aims of this study include characterization of the elderly population undergoing immune evaluation at the adult immunology clinic at the University of Florida. A retrospective chart review will be performed to describe the infectious history, associated immune serologic markers abnormalities, comorbid conditions and treatment management.

For this project the medical student will be involved in obtaining the necessary IRB approval for the study, perform chart review, data collection and analysis as well as a draft of a manuscript. The student will also have the opportunity to closely work with the mentors to write an article summarizing the findings/current knowledge and gaps in the immunology and hematology/oncology fields.

Entry Date: October 25, 2019

Project Title: Characterization of urticarial vasculitis patients: case series and literature review

Faculty Mentor’s Name:Dr. Mario Rodenas
Phone: 352-265-0420
Email: mario.rodenas@medicine.ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

Urticarial vasculitis (UV) is characterized by urticarial skin lesions lasting more than 24 hours. Vasculitides are a heterogenous group. UV may be divided into normocomplementemic and hypocomplementemic variants. Both subsets can be associated with systemic symptoms, such as angioedema, arthralgia or arthritis, abdominal or chest pain, fever, pulmonary disease, and renal disease among others.
Aims of this study include characterization of the population affected with urticarial vasculitis receiving care in the adult immunology clinic at the University of Florida. A retrospective chart review will be performed to investigate the diagnostic test practices involved, associated findings and treatment outcomes for this population.
For this project the medical student will be involved in obtaining the necessary IRB approval for the study, perform chart review, data collection and analysis as well as a draft of a manuscript. The student will also have the opportunity to closely work with the mentors to write an article summarizing current knowledge and gaps in the impact of immunomodulatory therapy in fields of allergy, immunology, rheumatology, and dermatology.

Co Mentor: Lyda Cuervo-Pardo,MD
Assistant Professor, Allergy & Clinical Immunology
lyda.cuervopardo@medicine.ufl.edu

Entry Date: October 25, 2019

Project Title: Colorectal Cancer Screening

Faculty Mentor’s Name: Dr. Maryam Sattari
Phone: 352-265-0651
Email: maryam.sattari@medicine.ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

Despite well-established effectiveness of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in its prevention and early detection, only two thirds of eligible adults undergo screening in the United States. Older studies suggested that patients do not undergo CRC screening because of fear of pain, embarrassment, lack of information and awareness of the importance of CRC screening, misperceptions about screening effectiveness, lack of resources, and failure of the physician to strongly recommend screening. More contemporary studies of this issue are needed.
The University of Florida (UF) College of Medicine started collaborating with the Florida Department of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the American Cancer Society in 2015 to enhance its CRC screening practices. One of the evidence-based interventions we have implemented is systemic identification of patients due/overdue for CRC screening. We propose to conduct various research projects using this information, once we have obtained approval by the UF Institutional Review Board. Examples include:
(1) A retrospective review of medical charts for the previously identified patients to determine characteristics predictive of compliance with evidence-based CRC screening.
(2) A survey of patients to determine if patients’ reasons for not undergoing CRC screening have changed over time.

Role of Medical Student: After consultation with the faculty mentor, the MSRP student will identify a research question (or questions) of interest to explore and conduct the surveys, data analysis, literature review, and preparation of at least one first-authored abstract and manuscript. Students may continue their collaboration throughout medical school.

Entry Date: November 7, 2019

Project Title: Prevalence of Chagas Disease in North Florida among at-risk individuals from Latin America

Faculty Mentor’s Name:Dr. Norman Beatty
Phone: 352-273-8830
Email: norman.beatty@medicine.ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

Background: Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by an infection with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Chronic disease often goes unrecognized for decades with 30-40% who will eventually die from cardiomyopathy, sudden cardiac arrest, and/or gastrointestinal illnesses. Other comorbidities such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and diabetes mellitus are common. Approximately 300,000 people in the United States and 18,000 here in Florida are living with Chagas disease but <1% have actually been diagnosed.
Hypothesis: Latin Americans are living with Chagas disease in Florida without a diagnosis and exhibit higher rates of other comorbidities compared to those who are uninfected.
Methods: Latin Americans who meet inclusion criteria will be recruited from participating outpatient clinics here in North Florida. They will have point of care Chagas disease testing and venous blood draw for further studies. Each participant will have a resting electrocardiography exam, body-mass index calculation, blood pressure measurements, and point of care hemoglobin A1C testing. Epidemiological data will be collected via an in-person survey.
Role of Medical Student: Participate in field work screening participants for Chagas disease and other comorbidities. Assist with in person survey and recruitment of study participants. Potential opportunity to travel to UCLA to visit Chagas disease center of excellence.
Funding: Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative (DNDi)
Publications: (1) Meymandi SK, et al. Prevalence of Chagas Disease in the Latin American-born Population of Los Angeles. Clin Inf Dis. 2017(64): 1182-1188. (2) Hernandez S, et al. Prevalence of Chagas Disease Among Family Members of Previously Diagnosed Patients in Los Angles, California. Clin Inf Dis. 2019

Entry Date:December 9, 2019

Project Title: Improving Advance Directive Completion in Patients without Insurance

Faculty Mentor’s Name:Melanie Hagen MD
Phone: 3522224895
Email: melanie.hagen@medicine.ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

Advance directives (ADs) are legal documents that allow patients to maintain autonomy over their healthcare at the end of life. They do so by allowing patients to choose medical treatments and healthcare surrogates while they have capacity to do so. The prevalence of older adults with ADs has been estimated to be as high as 55 to 60%, but it is lower for those without insurance or of lower income. For lower income and uninsured adults, little has been done to investigate the unmet needs concerning their end of life planning and effective strategies to meet those needs. We are conducting research at the Equal Access Clinic Network (EACN) to evaluate the utility of providing low income and uninsured patients AD counseling. Aims are to 1) Change misconceptions and improve knowledge about ADs, 2) Encourage AD completion, and 3) Promote patient directed care as evidenced by changes to patients’ default AD status. Prior studies suggest the prevalence of ADs in this low income and uninsured population will be well below the national average. They also suggest that the majority of those approached will be interested in completing ADs once they have been educated on what ADs are. Through this MSRP, medical students will learn to counsel patients on ADs. They will practice this skill in EACN clinics to educate patients on ADs and ultimately collect data for the study. They will also take part in data analysis, and help to report results in the form of a publication.

Entry Date: November 24, 2019

Project Title:Target Validation of New Compounds that Kills Leukemia Cells

Faculty Mentor’s Name:Dr. Christopher Cogle
Phone: 352-273-9448
Email: Christopher.cogle@medicine.ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

Large chemical library screen found new compounds that selectively kills AML cells. Now, we need to use proteomic testing to find out the binding targets of these compounds. Work will include DARTS, mass spec, Western blots, SPR imaging, PCR, shRNA down regulation of putative targets. Experience with these assays is preferred but not necessary.

Entry Date: September 20, 2019

Project Title: Pharmacogenetic Predictors of Therapeutic Response to Methotrexate in Patients with Sarcoidosis

Faculty Mentor’s Name:Dr. Divya Patel
Phone: 3522738735
Email: divya.patel@medicine.ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

A common clinical problem in sarcoidosis relates to the use of methotrexate, the most commonly used steroid-sparing agent in this disease. The use of methotrexate is complicated by a) unpredictable effectiveness, benefiting 40-60% of patients; b) delayed benefit in patients in whom it is effective; and c) high incidence of adverse effects. A potential solution to these difficulties is a priori identification of patients likely to benefit from methotrexate using pharmacogenetic screening for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding enzymes involved in methotrexate metabolic pathway. These functional SNPs have not been studied in sarcoidosis, but predict methotrexate treatment responses in other diseases. We therefore seek to test the hypothesis that, in patients with sarcoidosis, functional SNP predict clinical response to, and adverse effects from, methotrexate therapy. To test this hypothesis, we have identified 21 responders and 35 non-responders to methotrexate, as determined by change in lung function or steroid-sparing effect, in our clinic population. We propose to test these and another 51 subjects using GWAS to identify genetic variants associated with response to, and side-effects of, methotrexate.The translational impact of this study is that the ability to predict the therapeutic response and toxicity has the potential to change the standard of care in treating patients with sarcoidosis who are treated with disease-modifying drugs.

Entry Date: December 4, 2019

Project Title: EBM-Inc (Incorporating EBM into med ed)

Faculty Mentor’s Name:Dr. Rebecca Beyth
Phone: 352-548-6895 (office)
Email: rebecca.beyth@medicine.ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

The goal of this project is to develop brief evidence-based scenarios that can be incorporated into the current curriculum to further develop medical students’ clinical decision-making knowledge base and skills. This would entail identifying clinical topics from medical literature that can be developed into a case-scenario question that can be used to illustrate a key concept or principle in evidence-based medicine. These would be mapped to the major topic/organ system blocks in the first 2 years of the curriculum. The format for how to best incorporate them into curriculum would also be an avenue to explore. For example, brief/short video with and interactive Q&A. component, short podcasts or other media formats. There is no funding for this project. The interested medical student would need to be willing review current medical literature and have some skills/interests in using multimedia as a tool for medical education. This would be the first phase of the project, which would be primarily developmental with the goal of piloting them next academic year.

Entry Date: December 9, 2019

Project Title: Role of the kidney circadian clock in hypertension

Faculty Mentor’s Name:Dr. Michelle Gumz
Phone: 3522736887
Email: michelle.gumz@medicine.ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

Kidney disease and hypertension are epidemic in the U.S. Both renal function and blood pressure exhibit circadian rhythms in variation. Clinical and epidemiological studies have clearly demonstrated that loss of these circadian rhythms is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease and death. The Gumz lab has pioneered studies of the “kidney clock” in order to understand how the molecular components of the circadian clock contribute to physiology and pathophysiology. The Gumz lab has developed a number of transgenic mouse models to study the role of circadian clock proteins within the kidney in the regulation of renal function and blood pressure. We are currently funded by the NIH and the American Heart Association to study the mechanisms by which the clock proteins PERIOD1 and BMAL1 mediate opposing action on renal electrolyte handling and blood pressure. One example project for a summer medical student would be to measure levels of a given sodium transporter at the level of mRNA, protein, and subcellular localization using QPCR, Western blots, and immunohistochemistry to compare between control and various knockout mice that have been subjected to a high salt diet. These measurements would be made on samples that are already banked and available for testing. Representative recent publications include PMID: 30427705, PMID: 27636900, and PMID: 30714020.

Entry Date: December 4, 2019

Project Title: Incidence of methotrexate-induced bone marrow toxicity in US Veterans with rheumatoid arthritis

Faculty Mentor’s Name:Dr. Michael Bubb
Phone:352-294-8203
Email: bubbmr@medicine.ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the incidence of methotrexate-induced bone marrow toxicity in US Veterans with rheumatoid arthritis. Cytopenias including leukopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia have been reported in patients on methotrexate; however, the incidence of this effect is unclear and rarely requires dose adjustment. A recent study using methotrexate to lower cardiovascular risk (the CIRT trial) did not find that methotrexate decreased cardiovascular risk, but has been viewed as an independent opportunity to evaluate the risks of methotrexate therapy. One of the most prominent findings was of a low incidence of bone marrow suppression, and authors of that study have been proponents of changing guidelines for methotrexate use to reflect these data. One concern however is that the CIRT trial was only four years in duration and it is possible that bone marrow suppression reflects cumulative use of methotrexate. The hypothesis for this study is that the incidence of methotrexate-induced bone marrow toxicity is low among US Veterans with rheumatoid arthritis until late in their disease course, at which time it becomes significant.

The study will be a retrospective review of existing data from the VAMC electronic medical record CPRS, provided as a de-identified data set from VINCI. The participating student will review and analyze data to test the stated hypothesis, including patient age, gender, rheumatoid factor, CCP antibody, inflammatory markers (ESR and CRP), median dose of Methotrexate, duration of treatment with Methotrexate, comorbid medical conditions, CBC with differential, reason for ordering the CBC, frequency of a change to the methotrexate dose based upon an abnormal CBC, and whether the abnormal CBC was attributed to methotrexate or another cause.

Entry Date: December 10, 2019

Project Title: Do physical exam maneuvers predict relief of pain or improvement in function after subacromial corticosteroid injection?

Faculty Mentor’s Name:Dr. Michael Bubb
Phone:352-294-8203
Email:bubbmr@medicine.ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

Shoulder pain and loss of function are very common with aging, as nearly 2/3rds of men over 60 years of age experience these symptoms. Several prior studies have examined the sensitivity and specificity of physical exam maneuver for surgical findings of rotator cuff pathology. Unfortunately the extent of rotator cuff pathology is not patient-centric. The goal of a patient with shoulder complaints is less pain and improved function, but anatomic pathology correlates poorly with the patient’s perception of shoulder health. Corticosteroid injections of the subacromial bursa coupled with physical therapy may improve pain and function with little relationship to the underlying anatomic pathology. The ability to predict which patients will respond to these conservative measures based on physical exam would enable physicians to address the patient’s most important concerns, facilitating the choice between alternative treatments. This study will determine if any of the physical exam maneuvers that are part of the standard examination for shoulder pain predict a favorable patient-centric outcome after subacromial corticosteroid injection. A novel test of shoulder function is also proposed and will be compared with existing exam maneuvers.

Entry Date: December 10, 2019

Project Title: Violence in Television Viewing Choices Among Hospitalized Veterans: A Pilot Study

Faculty Mentor’s Name: Dr. Muna Canales
Phone: (352) 672-7433
Email: muna.canales@medicine.ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

Background: Mental health is a top priority for our U.S. Veterans. Decompensation of mental status such as post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety, violent behavior and others are common among hospitalized Veterans. Observations by the principal investigator and several of her colleagues on the VA inpatient ward suggest that many Veterans are watching both reality and fictional television programs that are violent. While several factors may be responsible, we hypothesize that what Veterans are watching on television contribute to their mental state while hospitalized. However, to date, no study has objectively examined the landscape of what Veterans are watching on television in the hospital and how this affects mental health outcomes.
Methods: As a stepping stone to understanding the impact of television content in the hospital on mental health outcomes, we propose a cross-sectional study in which the medical student will collect data on what hospitalized Veterans are watching. The medical student will collect data by shift (a different shift each day) over several weeks by walking by each room, looking in and recording the name of the show. Television shows will be rated on a 5-point scale (0=none, 5=most) with respect to violence, sex, drinking/drugs/smoking, language, positive messages, positive role models and consumerism, using a commonly used rating system. In descriptive analyses, we will provide the overall median [IQR] rating within each category and the proportion with ≥ 3 rating for each category. Then we will use non-parametric and chi-square tests, respectively, to compare median rating and rating ≥ 3 by between the following groups: 1) Shift (AM, afternoon, PM); 2) by geographic floor; 3) by surgical versus medical floors.
Role of the medical student: The medical student will complete any VA training required and will lead all data collection, entry and analysis under the supervision of the lead investigator. In addition, the medical student will compile the data for presentation and publication.

Entry Date: January 15, 2020

Project Title: Assessing gender bias in semi-annual evaluations of resident

Faculty Mentor’s Name: Dr. Julia Close
Phone: (352) 262-8074
Email: jclose@ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

Previous studies have demonstrated a gender bias in evaluations of medical students and residents in a variety of clinical fields. We are seeking to review the semi-annual evaluations of housestaff across the institution qualitatively to determine if similar findings are found. We will use inductive analysis to identify themes in written evaluations. The medical student will receive de-identified data to perform this analysis. No funding is needed for this project. Ref: Am J Surg. 2019 Feb; 217(2):306-313

Entry Date: March 3, 2020

Project Title: College-aged IBD patients’ healthcare utilization trends and patient satisfaction with use of telemedicine approaches

Faculty Mentor’s Name: Dr. Ellen Zimmermann
Phone: (352) 273-9474
Email: ezimmer2@ufl.edu

Research Project Description:

Our ultimate goal is to provide college-aged students with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis) the evidence-based clinical care, resources, and support necessary to be successful in college. The objectives of the current proposal are:

1. To determine the characteristics of college-aged students with inflammatory bowel disease including healthcare utilization patterns, disease severity, complication rates, and medication use, compared to older and younger cohorts using the OneFlorida Clinical Research database. The OneFlorida Clinical database is a research network containing claims and electronic health record data from over 15 million patients in the state of Florida.
2. To survey patients who have experienced telehealth visits with their UF gastroenterologist during the COVID-19 crisis for satisfaction, and attitudes about emergency departments and other venues for their care. Attitudes about telehealth will be stratified by age to inform us about college-aged patients’ attitudes. Ultimately (beyond the scope of tis student’s work), we will perform an intervention that includes age-specific marketing to engage college-aged patients and an IBD Patient Navigator to facilitate communication between the patient, an IBD-expert, and the patient’s home-town gastroenterologist, and/or primary care physician. An emphasis on evidence-based care and streamlined communication is expected to improve patient outcomes. This program is designed to facilitate college-aged patients’ participation as active stakeholders in their health care.
We aim to provide support, disseminate resources, and provide college-aged students easy access to high-quality, IBD-expert healthcare providers to help reduce emergency department visits, hospitalization rates, the need for surgery, and steroid use. Ultimately, we hope to improve the lives of college-aged patients with ulcerative colitis. This project will teach the student about challenges facing vulnerable populations and how they are addressed. She will be introduced to “big data” analyses, design and implementation of survey instruments, informed consent processes, data collection and analysis methods. We have an excellent team to help and she should be productive and have a great summer! Thank you for offering this opportunity.
Funding: New grant under review to cover OneFlorida expenses. Salaries covered by existing sources

Relevant references from our group:
1.Chen C, Hartzema AG, Xiao H, Wei YJ, Chaudhry N, Ewelukwa O, Glover SC, Zimmermann EM. Real-world Pattern of Biologic Use in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Treatment Persistence, Switching, and Importance of Concurrent Immunosuppressive Therapy. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2019;25(8):1417-27.
2. Chaudhry NA, Chen C, Pham A, Hartzema A, Glover SC, Zimmermann EM. Su1865 – The Epidemiology and Economic Health Burden of the College-Aged IBD Population. Gastroenterology. 2018;154(6):S-612
3. Pham A, Chaudhry N, Molina I, Flint A, Dang A, Qian L, Guo Y, McGetrick M, Beasley G, Estores I, Keefer L, Dubinsky M, EM. Z. College Adjustment and transition readiness in student-patients with IBD: age at diagnosis profoundly impacts the college experience. Inflammatory Bowel Disease. (submitted).
4. OneFlorida Clinical Research Consortium. IMPROVING HEALTH CARE 2020, February 11 [cited 2020 April 1]. Available from: https://onefloridaconsortium.org/.
5. Adler J, Raju S, Beveridge AS, Wang S, Zhu J, Zimmermann EM. College adjustment in University of Michigan students with Crohn’s and colitis. Inflamm Bowel Dis. 2008;14(9):1281-6.
5. Almadani SB, Adler J, Browning J, Green EH, Helvie K, Rizk RS, Zimmermann EM. Effects of inflammatory bowel disease on students’ adjustment to college. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014;12(12):2055-62.
6. Chaudhry NA, Zimmermann EM, Pham A, Flint A, Molina I, Behar-Horenstein. College students with inflammatory bowel disease: a qualitative study of challenges associated with college transition and self-care. Health Equity (In Press ).

Entry Date: May 8, 2020